Day 2 of our Christmas weekend travels

_N3A8352Today we woke up to a very windy day.  Rain was predicted for later afternoon but we have not seen it yet.  As we have no Christmas shopping to do and plenty of food in our little fridge we decided to go see the local lighthouse. Mersey Bluff in Devonport is only 17 kms from where we are staying.  We have been in Tasmania 30 years (almost) and never seen this candy cane light house.  There is a short walk around it and the coastline.

We loaded up Odie and Molly after their breakfast and off we went. Here are the photos.

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The windy coast
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I love the rocks along the coast.
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The hiking trail
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Is there anywhere dandelions don’t grow?
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Guess every one was Christmas shopping. The beach was empty. We didn’t go on it as there are no dogs allowed there.
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More rocks
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Back on top some more tourists were enjoying their lunch and the view.
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I am a great reader of plaques and signs. Must have derived from originally reading backs of cereal boxes as a child.
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One more close up. I believe this lighthouse is still in operation.

We stopped at a lookout on the way back to the cottage from the lighthouse. Beautiful cattle and long ranging views.

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Author: TravellinPenguin

I live a retired life in Tasmania, Australia. I love books, travel, animals, photography, motor biking and good friends. I indulge in all these activities with the little Travellin' Penguin who has now shared four continents with me. We love book shops, photography walks and time with friends as all our family is in USA and Canada. I enjoy visitors to my blog so hope you'll stop by.

7 thoughts on “Day 2 of our Christmas weekend travels”

  1. what a lovely place… dolerite, called diabase in the U.S., is a coarse grained, intrusive basalt, which is extruded lava from shield volcanos and dike fields like those found in Oregon and India… Tasmania has the largest exposure of dolerite in the world, about 40,000 cubic kilometers of it… most of the dolerite in that area resulted from the Jurassic breakup of Gondwanaland about 160 million years ago… i’ll bet you guessed i used to be a geologist… anyway, it looks like a wonderful place to visit and explore with a hand lens… there might even be some labradorite around there, a kind of plagioclase that has a rainbow effect in the right light… enjoy!!

    Liked by 1 person

      1. i don’t mean to be picky, although i guess i am… dolomite is a variety of limestone, mostly found in northern Italy… dolerite is what Tasmanians have; more than anyone else in the world! tx so much for the wonderful photos; very enjoyable…

        Like

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